Ancient War Axes catalogue of pictures, Bible Archaeology

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Map of the Middle East in ancient times

Where it happened

Use of helmets, different types, archaeology: helmets in the Bible

Helmets

Different types of armour in the ancient lands of the Bible: archaeology

Armor

Horses in warfare: chariot horse in the ancient world

Chariot horses

Different types of shields used in ancient warfare: Bible archaeology

Shields 

Development of the bow and arrow are weapons of war in ancient Bible lands

Bow & arrow

Slings in ancient warfare: David and Goliath: what archaeology tells us about the Bible story

Slings in warfare

War chariots: different types in different countries of the ancient Bible lands

War Chariots


 


 


 

 

Bible Study Resource

Pictures of ancient axes

Socketed axe-head found in a cave in the Judean desert in Israel in 1961

This socketed axe-head (above) was found in a cave in the Judean desert in Israel in 1961. With it were more than 450 copper objects from the Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age periods, circa 3100BC. Access to the cave was difficult, and it is assumed the copper objects were hidden there by people fleeing from an invading force. Possibly it was an Egyptian army, because at the time these objects were produced, Egypt was increasing its military presence in the south of Palestine.

 

Panel from the Sumerian Standard of Ur, showing a warrior and his four-wheeled chariot

Panel from the Sumerian Standard of Ur, showing a warrior and his four-wheeled chariot 
ready for battle. He carries a socketed axe in his right hand. 
The panel is encrusted with shell, lapis lazuli and red limestone.

 

Panel from the Sumerian Standard of Ur, showing foot soldiers carrying socketed axes.

Panel from the Sumerian Standard of Ur, showing foot soldiers carrying socketed axes.

 

Bronze socketed axehead from Khafajah

Copper socketed axehead from Khafajah, circa 2500BC. This blade would have been capable of piercing a metal helmet because its long narrow profile, combined with a firmly attached handle, meant it could be swung with considerable force.

 

A ceremonial royal axe from Ur, homeland of Abraham

A ceremonial royal axe from Ur, homeland of Abraham. It had gold bands around a wooden haft, 
and despite its beauty would have been capable of inflicting a fatal wound to the skull. Circa 2500BC.

 

A Sumerian warrior wearing a metal helmet and carrying a socketed axe and a sickle sword. From the temple of Ishtar at Mari.

A Sumerian warrior wearing a metal helmet and carrying a socketed axe and a sickle sword. 
From the temple of Ishtar at Mari.

 

Axe with a semicircular head, late 3rd millennium BC

Axe with a semicircular head, late 3rd millennium BC

 

Axe socket decorated with animal heads (lions?)

Axe socket decorated with animal heads (lions?) From the tomb at Til Barsip.

 

Syrian socketed axeheads from a tomb at Til Barsip, showing different blade shapes and sockets.

Syrian socketed axeheads from a tomb at Til Barsip, showing different blade shapes and sockets.

 

Crescent-shaped tanged cutting axe blade (right) from the excavations at Tell el-Hesi, 24th century BC

Crescent-shaped tanged cutting axe blade (right) from the excavations at Tell el-Hesi, 24th century BC.

 

Bronze-blade epsilon battleaxe with a silver haft (right) and handleless epsilon blade.

A cutting blade like this was horribly effective against tribesmen without helmets. Bronze-blade epsilon battleaxe with a silver haft (right) and handleless epsilon blade (left). Circa 20th century BC.

 

Egyptian wall relief of a warrior with epsilon axe, from XIth dynasty funerary temple of Mentuhotep II.

Egyptian wall relief of a warrior with epsilon axe, from XIth dynasty funerary temple of Mentuhotep II.

 

wall painting at the tomb of Beni-hasan, dating circa 1900BC, showing men armed with the typical weapons of Canaanites during the period of the Patriarchs

Detail from the famed wall painting at the tomb of Beni-hasan, dating circa 1900BC, showing men armed with the typical weapons of Canaanites during the period of the Patriarchs. The warrior at left carries an axe with a duck-bill blade, a double-convex bow, and a quiver.

 

Duck-bill axe blade excavated at Ugarit (19th century BC)

Duck-bill axe blade excavated at Ugarit (19th century BC)

 

The eye axe. This one is Egyptian, and socketless, the bronze blade being inserted into a hollow bronze haft.

The eye axe. This one is Egyptian, and socketless, 
the bronze blade being inserted into a hollow bronze haft.

 

An older type of Egyptian axeblade has ye-holes'but is socketless. Middle Kingdom circa 20th century BC.

This older type of Egyptian axeblade had 'eye-holes' but no sockets. 
Middle Kingdom circa 20th century BC.

 

Ceremonial axehead dating from the 12th dynasty, circa 1900BC

Ceremonial axehead dating from the 12th dynasty, circa 1900BC

 

Ceremonial axes with blades attached to a short gold sheath at the top of the wooden haft.

Ceremonial axes with blades attached to a short gold sheath at the top of the wooden haft.

 

This narrow lugged axeblade is inscribed with the name of Pharaoh Kamose, who fought the Hyksos and whose brother Ahmose eventually expelled them from Egypt.

This narrow lugged (at the top) axeblade is inscribed with the name of Pharaoh Kamose, who fought the Hyksos and whose brother Ahmose eventually expelled them from Egypt.

 

A ceremonial axe presented to Queen Ahhotep by her son King Ahmose. The bronze axehead, inlaid with gold, dates from about 1570BC

A ceremonial axe presented to Queen Ahhotep by her son King Ahmose. 
The bronze axehead, inlaid with gold, dates from about 1570BC.

 

Painting from the lid of a wooden chest found in Tutankhamun's tomb. This section of the paintings shows the Pharaoh followed by his retinue: guards in chariots and infantrymen armed with axes, spears and bows.

Painting from the lid of a wooden chest from Tutankhamun's tomb. This section shows the Pharaoh followed by his retinue: guards in chariots and infantrymen armed with axes, spears and bows.

 

A socketed bronze ax made in the shape of a hand or a plume. From Beth-shan, 14th century BC.

A socketed bronze ax made in the shape of a hand or a plume. From Beth-shan, 14th century BC.

 


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Bible Study Resource for Archaeology: Pictures of different type of axes: socket, tang, epsilon, anchor, eye and duck-bill; with images and descriptions

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